To the Editor:

To the wonderful people of Bluffton, I’m humbled and honored you have elected me to Bluffton Town Council. Similar to the saying “it takes a village to raise a child,” it also takes a team of committed people to make a good candidate.

Campaigns can be challenging, but the reward is meeting so many gracious, wonderful people. The number of “angels” that continued to find me and offer encouragement were more than I could imagine.

Each of us cherishes happy memories. You have now given me mine.

My campaign was always about preserving and protecting the wonderful qualities Bluffton has to offer. It is and will remain about our wonderful quality of life. This is the very reason we choose to live here.

To each of you, I will strive to make you proud. As we all like to say, “If it’s good for Bluffton, then it’s good for me.”

Dan Wood

Bluffton

To the Editor:

As much as the Beaufort County Board of Education might want it to do so, the issue with Superintendent Jeffrey Moss is not going to go away. I believe that the board needs to recognize and accept this reality.

Many people are going to continue to use the public comment portion of the board meetings to discuss their frustrations with the fact that basically nothing has been done to correct or remedy the behavior of the superintendent. And many, like me, will also continue to use letters to the editor in the local papers to vent our frustrations.

The board’s apparent “blind eye” to this fact means, to me, that board members, especially the chairperson and those who haven’t spoken-out on the issues, fully accept or condone the superintendent’s actions.

This is of major concern, considering his direct role in the nepotism aspects related to the issue and his extremely poor judgment throughout the entire time period it has been discussed in the community.

I urge the board members to have a public meeting focused on the superintendent’s actions and the board’s actions to correct or discipline him. An acceptable alternative would be for the board members to meet privately in executive session and then read a statement at the next board meeting condemning the superintendent’s actions and the punishment and sanctions the board is issuing as a result of it.

Only in this way will the public be able to appropriately assess the Board’s effectiveness and maybe move on to other pressing educational issues.

Michael F. Vezeau

Bluffton

To the Editor:

The latest athletic vs. academic conflict, the protest at the University of Missouri, ultimately resulting in a strike by the University’s Division 1 football team, is just a sample of what is wrong with higher education priorities.

The University faced a loss of $1 million in revenue from just their next football game if cancelled. The University caved in, the President resigned, the game was played, money talks!

Fifty colleges report annual revenue of over $50 million, encouraging some college athletes to request salaries for their services while others have pursued unionization and court action (Northwestern University). A recent Wall Street Journal editorial concluded “a conflict of values threatens to undermine or destroy Universities as a place of learning.”

Unfortunately, universities have put sports and revenue first and learning second, seriously short-changing their students. We have lost our prospective in education. The number one priority in college should be academics, preparing our young adults for the challenges of the world.

The fault lies in the misdirected overemphasis given to major intercollegiate sports by the influence and emphasis of the NCAA, lucrative TV contracts, media hype, alumni and intensive fan support – and you and I have allowed it to happen. The University of Missouri incident is just a microcosm of society’s habit of prioritizing selfish, short-term monetary gains while ignoring long-term socio-economic problems.

Whether at university , corporate or family levels, we need sound leadership, integrity and ethical standards applied with common sense.

Speak out. We can make a difference.

Earle Everett

Hilton Head Island